Ten Upcoming Books That Celebrate Diversity

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish in which book bloggers list their top ten picks for whatever the current prompt is.

I cannot overstate this: we need diverse books. We need a reality where a queer girl can read her story in books. Where a young Indian (or Filipino or Hispanic) can find heroes that look like him. Where a Muslim is represented regardfully. Where there are published works, both fiction and otherwise, with interracial couples, with parents that are both dads or moms. We need a reality that reflects the reality. Our reality. So it’s on us, readers, to talk about diversity and diverse books. Because by having this conversation, we’re informing publishers and agents that they can actively fish for these stories. That they need to. That they will sell.

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday does just that.

The prompt is to list down books that celebrate diversity/diverse characters. But I’m doing a bit of an alteration. Today, you shall have a respite from me gushing over Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda or More Happy Than Not or Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe. Because although I think one can never talk about books he loves enough, I also think one would benefit from continuously seeking out more. Thus, I’m featuring upcoming titles with a focus on diversity. They are arranged by date of publication.

NOTE: I a opted for books with cover designs and b acknowledge that this list leans on the LGBTQIA+ side. I had a hard time looking for books with racial, socioeconomic and/or religious diversity, which is very telling of the current situation in the industry.

*Click the cover to be directed to the book’s Goodreads page.*

George 01   Cam Girl 01   9780373211753_BB

George by Alex Gino (August 25th, Scholastic Press)
When people look at George, they think they see a boy. But she knows she’s not a boy. She knows she’s a girl.

George thinks she’ll have to keep this a secret forever. Then her teacher announces that their class play is going to be Charlotte’s Web. George really, really, REALLY wants to play Charlotte. But the teacher says she can’t even try out for the part . . . because she’s a boy.

With the help of her best friend, Kelly, George comes up with a plan. Not just so she can be Charlotte — but so everyone can know who she is, once and for all.

What We Left Behind by Robin Talley (October 27th, Harlequin Teen)
Toni and Gretchen are the couple everyone envied in high school. They’ve been together forever. They never fight. They’re deeply, hopelessly in love. When they separate for their first year at college—Toni to Harvard and Gretchen to NYU—they’re sure they’ll be fine. Where other long-distance relationships have fallen apart, their relationship will surely thrive.

The reality of being apart, however, is a lot different than they expected. As Toni, who identifies as genderqueer, falls in with a group of transgender upperclassmen and immediately finds a sense of belonging that has always been missing, Gretchen struggles to remember who she is outside their relationship.

While Toni worries that Gretchen, who is not trans, just won’t understand what is going on, Gretchen begins to wonder where she fits in Toni’s life. As distance and Toni’s shifting gender identity begins to wear on their relationship, the couple must decide—have they grown apart for good, or is love enough to keep them together?

Cam Girl by Leah Raeder (November 3rd, Atria)
Vada Bergen is broke, the black sheep of her family, and moving a thousand miles away from home for grad school, but she’s got the two things she loves most: her art, and her best friend and soulmate, Ellis Carraway. Elle and Vada have a friendship so consuming it’s hard to tell where one girl ends and the other begins. It’s intense. It’s a little codependent. And nothing can tear them apart.

Until an accident on an icy winter road changes everything.

Vada is left deeply scarred, both emotionally and physically. Her once-promising art career is cut short. And Ellis pulls away, unwilling to talk about that night. Everything Vada loved is gone.

She’s got nothing left to lose.

So when she meets a smooth-talking lothario who offers to set her up as a cam girl, she can’t say no. All Vada has to do is spend a couple hours each night taking off her clothes on webcam, and the “tips” come pouring in.

It’s all just kinky fun till a client gets serious. “Blue” is mysterious, alluring, and more interested in Vada’s life than her body. Online, they open up to each other intimately. Blue helps her heal. And he pays well, but he wants her all to himself. No more cam shows. She agrees, because she’s starting to fall for him. And when he asks to meet, she says yes. Because she’s dying to know the real man behind the keyboard.

Even if one of his conditions is to bring Ellis. The girl who wants nothing to do with her anymore.

Now Vada must confront the past she’s been running from. A past full of devastating secrets—those of others, and those she’s been keeping from herself…

Soundless 01   This is Where it Ends 01   We are the Ants 01

Soundless by Richelle Mead (November 10th, Razorbill)
For as long as Fei can remember, there has been no sound in her village, where rocky terrain and frequent avalanches prevent residents from self-sustaining. Fei and her people are at the mercy of a zipline that carries food up the treacherous cliffs from Beiguo, a mysterious faraway kingdom.

When villagers begin to lose their sight, deliveries from the zipline shrink and many go hungry. Fei’s home, the people she loves, and her entire existence is plunged into crisis, under threat of darkness and starvation.

But soon Fei is awoken in the night by a searing noise, and sound becomes her weapon.

This is Where it Ends by Marieke Nijkamp (January 5th, Sourcebooks Fire)
10:00 a.m.
The principal of Opportunity, Alabama’s high school finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m.
The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03 a.m.
The auditorium doors won’t open.

10:05 a.m.
Someone starts shooting.

We are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson (January 19th, Simon Pulse)
Henry Denton doesn’t know why the aliens chose to abduct him when he was thirteen, and he doesn’t know why they continue to steal him from his bed and take him aboard their ship. He doesn’t know why the world is going to end or why the aliens have offered him the opportunity to avert the impending disaster by pressing a big red button.

But they have. And they’ve only given him 144 days to make up his mind.

Since the suicide of his boyfriend, Jesse, Henry has been adrift. He’s become estranged from his best friend, started hooking up with his sworn enemy, and his family is oblivious to everything that’s going on around them. As far as Henry is concerned, a world without Jesse is a world he isn’t sure is worth saving. Until he meets Diego Vega, an artist with a secret past who forces Henry to question his beliefs, his place in the universe, and whether any of it really matters. But before Henry can save the world, he’s got to figure out how to save himself, and the aliens haven’t given him a button for that.

Away We Go 01   Symptoms of Being Human 01   The Great American Whatever 01   Saving Montgomery Sole 01

Away We Go by Emil Ostrovski (February 2nd, Greenwillow Books)
Westing is not your typical school. For starters, you have to have one very important quality in order to be admitted—you have to be dying. Every student at Westing has been diagnosed with PPV, or the Peter Pan Virus. No one is expected to live to graduation.

What do you do when you go to a school where no one has a future? Noah Falls, his girlfriend Alice, and his best friend Marty spend their time drinking, making out, and playing video games on awaywego.com. But when an older boy named Zach (who Noah may or may not be in love with) invites Noah and Marty to join his secret Polo Club, the lives of both boys change as they struggle to find meaning in their shortened existence.

Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin (February 2nd, Balzer + Bray)
Riley Cavanaugh is many things: Punk rock. Snarky. Rebellious. And gender fluid. Some days Riley identifies as a boy, and others as a girl. The thing is . . . Riley isn’t exactly out yet. And between starting a new school and having a congressman father running for reelection in uber-conservative Orange County, the pressure—media and otherwise—is building up in Riley’s so-called “normal” life.

On the advice of a therapist, Riley starts an anonymous blog to vent those pent-up feelings and tell the truth of what it’s REALLY like to be a gender-fluid teenager. But just as Riley’s starting to settle in at school—even developing feelings for a mysterious outcast—the blog goes viral, and an unnamed commenter discovers Riley’s real identity, threatening exposure. Riley must make a choice: walk away from what the blog has created—a lifeline, new friends, a cause to believe in—or stand up, come out, and risk everything.

The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle (March 29th, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)
Quinn Roberts is a sixteen-year-old smart aleck and Hollywood hopeful whose only worry used to be writing convincing dialogue for the movies he made with his sister Annabeth. Of course, that was all before—before Quinn stopped going to school, before his mom started sleeping on the sofa…and before Annabeth was killed in a car accident.

Enter Geoff, Quinn’s best friend who insists it’s time that Quinn came out—at least from hibernation. One haircut later, Geoff drags Quinn to his first college party, where instead of nursing his pain, he meets a guy—a hot one—and falls hard. What follows is an upside-down week in which Quinn begins imagining his future as a screenplay that might actually have a happily-ever-after ending—if, that is, he can finally step back into the starring role of his own life story.

Saving Montgomery Sole by Mariko Tamaki (April 19th, Roaring Brook Press)
Montgomery Sole is a square peg in a small town, forced to go to a school full of jocks and girls who don’t even know what irony is. It would all be impossible if it weren’t for her best friends, Thomas and Naoki. The three are also the only members of Jefferson High’s Mystery Club, dedicated to exploring the weird and unexplained, from ESP and astrology to super powers and mysterious objects.

Then there’s the Eye of Know, the possibly powerful crystal amulet Monty bought online. Will it help her predict the future or fight back against the ignorant jerks who make fun of Thomas for being gay or Monty for having two moms? Maybe the Eye is here just in time, because the newest resident of their small town is scarier than mothmen, poltergeists, or, you know, gym.

I also want to give shout outs to The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness, Fans of the Impossible Life by Kate Scelsa, Cut Both Ways by Carrie Mesrobian and Carry On by Rainbow Rowell, which I excluded just because they were recently featured in another TTT. I’ve already read Fans and I definitely, definitely recommend it!

What did I miss? Give me all the recs!

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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22 thoughts on “Ten Upcoming Books That Celebrate Diversity

  1. Miel! That intro. That note. YES.
    I have the majority of these on my TBR.
    Here are some recs for spectacular upcoming books:
    Ramona Drowning by Julie Murphy (Questioning in LGBTQ)
    The Girl From Everywhere by Griding Heilig (LGBTQ with pirates, magic, badassery, where has this been?)
    Beast by Brie Spangler (LGBTQ, trans Beauty. Ahem, finalllyyyy)
    Quiltbag by Ava Jae (LGBTQ)
    The Abyss Surrounds Us by Emily Skrutskie (LGBTQ, magic and badassery, finally)
    First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter (dark contemp involving mental illness)
    Timekeeper by Tara Sim (LGBTQ, historical fic)
    Weaving A Net Is Better Than Praying For Fish by Ki-Wing Merlin (POC, Chinese-American)
    Stef Soto, Taco Queen by Jennifer Torres (POC, Mexican-American, where has this been?)

    Like

  2. Great List! 🙂
    There are lots on your list that I really want to read; George, This is Where it Ends, Away We Go. Some others I haven’t heard of, so I am definitely going to head over to Goodreads and check them out.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Well George made me think, until I read part of the synopsis, that it was a LGBT+ retelling or expansion of Curious George (which actually would be perfect and I want that), so that was a little perplexing; other than that I know nothing about any of these books but you’ve given me plenty to research and likely more to add to my tbr. Soundless, particularly, looks and sounds fairly awesomely fantastical.
    I love your list and your opening thoughts. That was really brilliantly done, Shelumiel. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Romi! Thank you so much for your kind words! Absolutely makes me remember why I do what I do with my blog. And I’m just happy everyone (almost) is talking about diversity and how it’s shaping up to be in the publishing industry. As for Curious George, I don’t know this story? Oops. Haha! Thanks for dropping by!

      Like

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