Rainbow Rowell Week, Day 5: More Than the Books

Rainbow Rowell Week

Rainbow Rowell is an Awesome Human Being Period.

For five days this week*, Bookish and Awesome is celebrating Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week. You can read the previous posts here, herehere and here.

I don’t know about you but what really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call—wait, what? No no no no. Of course I agree with Salinger, but we have Twitter now, right? Right. (Also, I’m super awkward with phone calls.) And, while I become a fan of writers based on their works, I love me an author that I know and feel is a real person. Someone who talks about other stuff besides his/her book(s). Besides books in general, actually. Someone like Rainbow Rowell.

And so for today (the last day of Rainbow Rowell Week you guys!), let’s have a round of Rainbow Wisdom, shall we? Here goes!

I feel things very intensely. And I also think that real life is more romantic if you allow it to be, if you don’t act like it’s immature to get excited.” (This reminds me of something Alex London, another beloved author who wrote Proxy and Guardian, told me on Tumblr: “never apologize for fanboying! It’s a wonderful thing to be excited about stuff.”)

If you think YA is simple, you probably haven’t read a lot of it. But YA is not a genre. It’s just this really loosely defined category of books.”

“I’ve never loved the name “Rainbow”—it seems like a name you’d give to your stuffed unicorn—but I really like having an unusual name. It stands out. And it made me feel like it was okay to stand out. To be different.

“When you’re a teenager, you worry that maybe you’re the only person feeling this weird or scary or perverted thing. And YA books tell you, “Nope. Your weird stuff is pretty normal, and you’re not the only one who’s scared.“”

“When I think of it, Neal isn’t the unusual character for not pursuing his dreams. Georgie’s unusual, because she’s known what she wanted to do since college and now she’s doing it. If you think about it, most people are making do. They’re not living their dreams, but they’re not living a miserable existence, either.”

And Rainbow on Twitter? Wry. Very. And thoughtful, as ever.

THANK YOU SO MUCH, YOU WONDERFUL YOU, FOR TUNING IN AND FOR THE COMMENTS (I ALWAYS, ALWAYS GET VERY EXCITED WHEN ONE OF YOU REACT TO ANY OF WHAT I WRITE)! I hope I’ve encouraged those who still haven’t read Rainbow Rowell to give it a shot. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, RAINBOW! I love you with all my bookish heart!

What about your, dear readers? Who are the authors you think that win in life? Also, if you want to blog about your personal experience with Rowell or her books, grab that header image above and leave a comment below. I’ll link up to you in the coming articles! Or we can bring this to Twitter. YES! Share your Rainbow Rowell stories using the hashtag #RainbowRowellWeek. Again, Happy Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week!

*Why this week you ask? Because it’s her birthday last 24th!

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Rainbow Rowell Week, Day 4: What to Read Next After Eleanor and Park

Rainbow Rowell Week

A Diversified If-You-Like-This-Try-This.

For five days this week*, Bookish and Awesome is celebrating Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week. You can read the previous posts here, here and here.

I guess it’s fair to say that Eleanor & Park was the book that really catapulted Rainbow Rowell into the position she’s currently in. I mean, not to discredit her other titles (Fangirl is my favorite, if you haven’t noticed) or anything. But it’s what most of us would consider our gateway to her, wouldn’t it? And I know a lot of you out there love it. So for today, I’ll be throwing recommendations for what to read next if you like Eleanor & Park.

Of course, in and of itself, Eleanor & Park has diversity in it. Park is half-Korean after all. But for these books I’m gonna talk about, I consciously picked novels with the MC(s) being of color and/or LGBTQ. Because these lives matter too, our lives. And just how Rainbow plainly put it in her website, “because it’s up to people like me, who write, to write them.”

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Dante can swim. Ari can’t. Dante is articulate and self-assured. Ari has a hard time with words and suffers from self-doubt. Dante gets lost in poetry and art. Ari gets lost in thoughts of his older brother who is in prison. Dante is fair skinned. Ari’s features are much darker. It seems that a boy like Dante, with his open and unique perspective on life, would be the last person to break down the walls that Ari has built around himself.

But against all odds, when Ari and Dante meet, they develop a special bond that will teach them the most important truths of their lives, and help define the people they want to be. But there are big hurdles in their way, and only by believing in each other—and the power of their friendship—can Ari and Dante emerge stronger on the other side.

At its core, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe is a story of love in all its complexity. It gave me that same bittersweet taste that Eleanor & Park has. The two MC’s are both Mexican-American, that’s one point for ethnic diversity. And another for gender identity. Also, this is one of those books that―while it’s about diversity―is so much more than just about diversity. Diversity is there not for the sake of diversity, but because it just is. Basically, I’d recommend this to anyone, any day.

Gabi, a Girl in Pieces

Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero

Gabi Hernandez chronicles her last year in high school in her diary: college applications, Cindy’s pregnancy, Sebastian’s coming out, the cute boys, her father’s meth habit, and the food she craves. And best of all, the poetry that helps forge her identity.

July 24

My mother named me Gabriella, after my grandmother who, coincidentally, didn’t want to meet me when I was born because my mother was unmarried, and therefore living in sin. My mom has told me the story many, many, MANY, times of how, when she confessed to my grandmother that she was pregnant with me, her mother beat her. BEAT HER! She was twenty-five. That story is the basis of my sexual education and has reiterated why it’s important to wait until you’re married to give it up. So now, every time I go out with a guy, my mom says, “Ojos abiertos, piernas cerradas.” Eyes open, legs closed. That’s as far as the birds and the bees talk has gone. And I don’t mind it. I don’t necessarily agree with that whole wait until you’re married crap, though. I mean, this is America and the 21st century; not Mexico one hundred years ago. But, of course, I can’t tell my mom that because she will think I’m bad. Or worse: trying to be White.

So. First love? Check. Low self-esteem? Check. Family dysfunction? Check check. Gabi’s a Latina and there are issues involving sexual orientation and gender roles. Obviously this screams Diversity. I must add, however, that I haven’t read this one. But award-winning Cuban-American author Meg Medina approves, says Quintero’s writing “gets at everything, all at once.” And, honestly, you can’t go wrong with that.

If I Ever Get Out of Here

If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth

Lewis “Shoe” Blake is used to the joys and difficulties of life on the Tuscarora Indian reservation in 1975: the joking, the Fireball games, the snow blowing through his roof. What he’s not used to is white people being nice to him―people like George Haddonfield, whose family recently moved to town with the Air Force. As the boys connect through their mutual passion for music, especially the Beatles, Lewis has to lie more and more to hide the reality of his family’s poverty from George. He also has to deal with the vicious Evan Reininger, who makes Lewis the special target of his wrath. But when everyone else is on Evan’s side, how can he be defeated? And if George finds out the truth about Lewis’s home―will he still be his friend?

A relationship (in this case friendship) that’s built on a shared love of music? Does that ring a bell? Not to mention the MC is from a poor family. He also happens to be American-Indian and is often picked on at school. Again, I haven’t read this one but I’m totally sold. Mary Quattlebaum of The Washington Post wrote, “funny, poignant . . . Lewis is a wry, observant narrator.” Plus, this book is set in the ’70s and Eleanor and Park‘s in the ’80s.

ALSO. Jen of Pop! Goes the Reader published a very funky Fangirl-themed The Writing’s On The Wall! So much love for Rainbow Rowell and Fangirl! (PS. This article has nothing to do with Bookish and Awesome.)

Which of these titles have you read? Which ones will you read? Also, if you want to blog about your personal experience with Rowell or her books, grab that header image above and leave a comment below. I’ll link up to you in the coming articles! Or we can bring this to Twitter. YES! Share your Rainbow Rowell stories using the hashtag #RainbowRowellWeek. Again, Happy Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week !

*Why this week you ask? Because it’s her birthday last 24th!

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Rainbow Rowell Week, Day 3: Read to Me Sweetheart

Rainbow Rowell Week

Fangirl in Beautiful Posters.

For five days this week*, Bookish and Awesome is celebrating Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week. You can read the previous posts here and here.

Today, I have a very special guest post from the charming and talented owner of Stay Bookish, Hazel Ureta.


Well hello there, awesome bookish nerds! I’m Hazel and I blog over at Stay Bookish. I’m here today on Bookish and Awesome to celebrate Rainbow Rowell Week with Shelumiel. Like the writer of this wonderful blog, I also love Rainbow and her books but most especially Fangirl. What can I say, I’m a fangirl at heart and that book is my life story. Anyhow, there are some super lovely quotes from the book and I’m sharing my favourites today! And because I’m a try-hard designer, I designed some posters as graphics. Hope you like them! ❤

Fangirl Quote - Tomorrow

“”Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow,” he said.” – Fangirl, Rainbow Rowell.

Fangirl Quote - I Choose You Over Everyone

“I choose you over everyone.” – Levi, Fangirl.

Fangirl Quote - Read to Me Sweetheart

“Read to me sweetheart.” – Levi, Fangirl.


Thank you, Hazel, for dropping by the blog and for these beautiful posters! I LOVE THEM!

Hazel is also running a companion post over at her blog and she’s talking about Eleanor & Park. So be sure to check that one out and hop over to Stay Bookish. Now.

What are your favorite Rainbow Rowell quotations? And do you think anyone can live solely on peanut butter? Also, if you want to blog about your personal experience with Rowell or her books, grab that header image above and leave a comment below. I’ll link up to you in the coming articles! Or we can bring this to Twitter. YES! Share your Rainbow Rowell stories using the hashtag #RainbowRowellWeek. Again, happy Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week everyone!

Hazel is the nineteen-year-old bibliophile behind the blog, Stay Bookish, where she posts her bookish musings and occasionally swoons over fictional characters. Her mission in life is to spread the love for books as she believes the nirvana of reading can only be achieved once you share it with other people. You can also find her on Twitter @staybookish and Tumblr.

*Why this week you ask? Because it’s her birthday yesterday (24th)!

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Rainbow Rowell Week, Day 2: Where is My Chill?

Rainbow Rowell Week

Reading Rainbow Rowell in Gifs.

For five days this week*, Bookish and Awesome is celebrating Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week. You can read the previous post here.

So I love Rainbow Rowell (which you already know, duh) and I think gifs are the awesomest. Hence, these are me in gifs, me in various windows of reading her books (in no particular order).

Sometimes, I’m all:

Jeremy Renner

But then other characters, say Richie, have me be like:

Regina George 01via

And this is me with certain dialogues:

Emma Stone 01via

Or:

Kristen Bell 01via

Or, not really really, but, like, inside my head:

Gossip Girl 01via

Some characters are incredibly fleshed out they have me thinking:

Kristen Wiigvia

And out of nowhere, I’d be:

Klausvia
Avengers 01
via

End of the day? Here:

Taylor Swift 01via
Genius
via

What is your favorite Rainbow Rowell book? Sound off in the comments below! Also, if you want to blog about your personal experience with Rowell or her books, grab that header image above and leave a comment below. I’ll link up to you in the coming articles! Or we can bring this to Twitter. YES! Share your Rainbow Rowell stories using the hashtag #RainbowRowellWeek. Again, happy birthday Rainbow Rowell and happy Appreciation Week y’all!

*Why this week you ask? Because it’s her birthday today (24th)!

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Rainbow Rowell Week, Day 1: Wait, My Feels

Rainbow Rowell Week

An Ode to Rainbow-freakin-Rowell*.

Have you ever picked up a book where the author made you pause and let a passage sink in? Or, like, full-on stop and whisper, wait, my feels? I can probably pick five writers who did this to me, but one name that easily comes to mind is Rainbow Rowell. And for five days this week**, Bookish and Awesome is celebrating this very person. Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week mayhem, shoot the confetti cannons!

Confetti Cannonvia

There is a book in my room, Rainbow. A book that sits highly among my Favorites of the Favorites. It’s by you.

You write like you understand me. Like, you know what it feels like and you get it. It doesn’t matter whether it’s first love or first kiss or saving a marriage or whatever. You write and the reader responds. I remember vividly grinning like a lunatic at certain scenes from Fangirl and resonating badly with how Eleanor defined missing someone. And then there were those times when I would hold back tears (because I’m macho thank you very much). And I snorted quite a few times, too.

I fell in love with Cath and Levi. I rooted for Eleanor and Park. I hoped with Georgie McCool. Reagan was absolutely something, and her conversations with Cath are gems. There isn’t a single dead rubber character in your hands, even Snow and Baz, who are works of fiction inside Fangirl. In fact, as a testament to this, Snow and Baz are having their own book. Carry On is set for an October 5 release, right? A novel based on a fanfiction of another fanfiction of a real novel, inside a work of fiction? I mean, WHO DOES THAT? Moreover, who can make readers bite into that? Only you, Rainbow, you crazy you.

You command your words; you’re a natural that way. You’re the Queen of Dialogues. It’s not flowery, sweeps-you-off-your-feet kind of thing. It’s a-million-butterflies-come-alive-inside-your-stomach. You hit the spot, and very well you do. I also love your humor, have I told you this? It’s not laugh-out-loud exactly… More like Neal’s I’m-laughing-on-the-inside-right-now***. And this doesn’t end in your books. I’ve witnessed you killing it on Twitter. You’re outrageous. You never fail to crack me up. And props to being personable besides. I’ll consume a dialogue between a baker and an old lady written by you if I ever find one.

So thank you, Rainbow Rowell! Thank you for failing at your plans A and B.

NOTE: Of course, others can make cases to refute my calling Rainbow Rowell basically a staggering genius. But that’s not the point.

What about you dear readers? Do you love Rainbow Rowell as much as I do? Fangirl or Eleanor & Park (or, you know, choose from her adult titles)? Also, I have an idea! If you want to blog about your cry of adoration for Rainbow or her books, grab that header image above and leave a comment below. I’ll link up to you in the coming articles! Or we can bring this to Twitter. YES! Share your Rainbow Rowell stories using the hashtag #RainbowRowellWeek. Again, happy  Rainbow Rowell Appreciation Week!

The Adventure Time 02via

*I say this in the most endearing way possible to humans.
**Why this week you ask? Because it’s her birthday tomorrow (24th)!

***That’s a Landline reference for you, kid.

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