Unmissable Weekly: October 15, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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In addition to trademark romantic and coming-of-age elements, the upcoming book features an array of pop culture references that should especially excite movie buffs. From Twinkle, With Love is told from the perspective of aspiring filmmaker Twinkle Mehra, and uses her passion to tell her story: The book takes the form of letters Twinkle writes to her favorite directors.

I love it when authors play with format, and this sounds very exciting. Plus, look at the cover with a Desi woman!

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It was really hard, especially at first, to write about this thing that’s been such a big part of my life. But in another way, it was really empowering because I felt like if I could give it form or expression I could look at it and I could talk about it directly rather than being scared of it. And one of the main things I wanted to do in the book was to get at how isolating it can be to live with mental illness and also how difficult it can be for the people who are around you because you’re so isolated.

John Green talked about mental illness and writing a book that mirrors his own life.

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At a news conference at his London publisher’s office on Thursday, Mr. Ishiguro was characteristically self-effacing, saying that the award was a genuine shock. “If I had even a suspicion, I would have washed my hair this morning,” he said.

He added that when he thinks of “all the great writers living at this time who haven’t won this prize, I feel slightly like an impostor.”

Congratulations Kazuo Ishiguro, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature!

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“Excited to share the first poster for a film that celebrates love,” Berlanti, who directs the film, tweeted with the first poster.

The first Love, Simon poster is here and I HAVE ZERO CHILLS.

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Unmissable Weekly: October 8, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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The book to film adaptation of Becky Albertalli’s [Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda] has done a bit of re-branding as we approach its 2018 release.

As confirmed by the author this afternoon, the new title for the movie is simply Love, Simon — a reference to the e-mails in the story as well as the romantic aspect.

And as Becky puts it, “The movie feels like a love letter. Now the title does too.

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From the moment I finished Dumplin’ I knew I wanted to return to Clover City, but I also knew that I was 100% satisfied with how Willowdean’s story ended. When I got the green light to write another book in the same world, I thought long and hard about who intrigued me the most (Millie! Though Hannah and Mitch were a close second!) and who needed to do the most growing (Callie!).

There’s a cover for Julie Murphie’s companion novel, Puddin’, and it’s gorgeous!

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It began with more than 1,500 books.

With all the works submitted by publishers, the judges for this year’s National Book Awards have had their hands (and bookshelves) full the past few months. But that daunting number of contenders winnowed further Wednesday, as the National Book Foundation announced the finalists for its literary prize — just five works each in four categories: fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people’s literature.

The 2017 National Book Award shortlists were recently announced and 75% were written by women (!) and 50% were by people of color (!). There’s also one Oglala Lakota poet. I’m impressed by these numbers!

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Two YA authors who met-cute via their agent have co-written a novel—in which two boys meet-cute in a New York City post office. What If It’s Us by Adam Silvera and Becky Albertalli will be published cute too: it will be released in fall 2018 by not just one but two HarperCollins imprints: HarperTeen and Balzer + Bray.

No, I am not freaking out. YOU are.

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Unmissable Weekly: October 1, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Harry Potter: The Wand Collection provides a detailed look at each major wand used in the Harry Potter films, along with a breakdown of what it’s made of and why that matters. Harry and Voldemort, of course, both have wands with a phoenix feather core (drawn from Dumbledore’s own phoenix, Fawkes) and that connection has major consequences for the series. Ron Weasley, for his part, goes through a couple different wands over the course of the series as they’re broken and misplaced — all three are examined here.

Insight Editions is releasing a book in November 14 detailing the nature of each major Harry Potter character’s relationship with their wand.

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“Yes I am,” Parton confirms when asked if she’s working with Aniston. “She’s producing and starring in a movie called Dumplin’ and it was a best-selling book and in the book this girl that’s the character was a Dolly fan and loved her music.”

Parton continues, “And so it inspired her in her life and so of course they’re using a lot of my music from the old days but they asked me to write some new pieces and a theme song.”

Full circle! Dolly Parton is writing original music for Dumplin’.

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I make a decision about what to review based on a number of factors: Is the book newsworthy? Is it a book that I think our readers should know about? Is it a novel that’s doing something new, or a nonfiction book that has an interesting argument? Is the author important? Then, of course, there are my own tastes — what’s exciting and enticing to me.

On the most recent member of The New York Times‘ team of daily book critics Parul Sehgal’s process of selecting and reviewing books.

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Grishaverse fans, rejoice: Leigh Bardugo’s next book not only returns to the world she created but centers on one of her most beloved characters too. Due out in Winter 2019, King of Scars centers on Nikolai Lantsov, King of Ravka, who we first met as the young, mysterious commander Sturmhond.

THIS IS NOT A DRILL.

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Unmissable Weekly: September 24, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Pakistan’s newest female superhero has vowed to battle venal officials and protect battered women, as her creator tries to inspire the next generation to fight injustice in a deeply patriarchal society.

The new Pakistan Girl comic series is based on Sarah, a regular teenager with a pet cat, who discovers she has superhuman powers after waking from a coma caused by a blast in her village.

Good news is good.

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Kirkus Reviews, the nation’s leading pre-publication journal of book reviews, today announced the six finalists for the fourth annual Kirkus Prize in the categories of Fiction, Nonfiction, and Young Readers’ Literature. The Kirkus Prize is one of the richest annual literary awards in the world. Winners in the three categories will each receive $50,000, and will be announced at a special ceremony in Austin, Texas on Thursday, November 2, 2017.

The 2017 Kirkus Prize finalists were recently announced and yaaay Angie Thomas and The Hate U Give!

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The heroine of Hank Green’s debut novel, “An Absolutely Remarkable Thing,” is an art student in New York City named April May, who finds herself at the center of a vast international mystery. One day, April stumbles on a giant robot sculpture in Midtown Manhattan, and makes a video with the figure, which goes viral. She becomes famous as news spreads that similar sculptures have mysteriously appeared in dozens of cities, and people around the world struggle to understand where the figures came from and what they mean.

What an absolutely delightful time to be a nerdfighter!

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Judi Dench is in early talks to join Disney’s “Artemis Fowl” movie adaptation from director Kenneth Branagh.

Written by Eoin Colfer, the children’s books follow the brilliant and cunning 12-year-old eponymous criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl II, whose plot to extort gold from the secret Fairy People puts him directly in the crosshairs of some of the most dangerous creatures on earth.

Branagh and Disney’s Artemis Fowl movie adaption is beginning to take shape. Disney recently dated the film for an August 9, 2019 release.

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Unmissable Weekly: September 17, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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“Long Way Down” is one of two books among this year’s contenders for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature that concerns a teen-ager confronting the murder of a loved one. In “The Hate U Give,” the début novel of Angie Thomas, a sixteen-year-old named Starr sees a police officer shoot and kill a childhood friend, and is propelled into activism. The longlist also includes novels about the immigrant experiences of Indian, Mexican, and Haitian families; a novel about adoption and identity; and one about finding love in an inhospitable environment.

Congratulations to these authors who made the longlist for the 2017 National Book Awards under the category of Young People’s Literature!

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My delight and surprise in landing at the top of the New York Times young adult best-seller list a few weeks ago as a first-time author was short-lived. In an instant, I was pummeled on social media, accused of gaming the system, and summarily yanked off the list.

My book made headlines worldwide — but for all the wrong reasons.

But I honestly believe the steps I took are well within the rules,” she says. “Okaaaaaay,” I say.

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Edim teared up during her opening remarks, expressing that this festival, this community, has helped her find her purpose and her people. Like Edim, I found myself tearing up at several moments throughout the event, especially during Naomi Jackson’s stunning speech on inclusion, writing with the women in her family in mind and finding her ground as a writer. At one point, I looked around the auditorium, taking in the many shades of brown, the many textures of tresses, and the collective expression of peace and comfort on everyone’s face. It was where I needed to be.

A heartwarming account of one woman of color attending the first Well-Read Black Girl Festival and remembering she was born to write and read.

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The great-grandnephew of Bram Stoker is writing the first authorised prequel to Dracula, based on scholarly research into the original, unedited version of Stoker’s 1897 tale of the undead count, as well as Stoker family legends.

Heads up classics nerds and Gothic lit fans!

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Roald Dahl, the author of the original Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, apparently had different plans for his protagonist: he wanted Charlie to be black. According to his widow, Liccy Dahl, and his biographer, Donald Sturrock, “It was his agent who thought it was a bad idea when the book was first published to have a black hero.”

Hmmm. I’m feeling slightly ungenerous about—and throwing side-eyes on—this. But of one thing I’m certain: big industries, like the publishing, has a long history of systemic racism.

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It’s impossible to read a Harry Potter book without wishing that Hogwarts is real. Two decades after the first novel was released, a part of us still secretly dream of experiencing the wizardry academy for ourselves. And now, PBteen’s newest home collaboration with the beloved series has just made all of our childhood fantasies come true.

ACCIO EVERYTHING!

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Unmissable Weekly: September 10, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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No need to bury the lede here. Mississippi teen Eagan Tilghman put his 3-year-old brother to excellent use by dressing him as a miniature Pennywise from It. The results are…my god, they’re startling.

WHY WHY WHY WHY WHY WHY!?

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For many of us, Animal Farm was a book that most of read in High School (or pretended to, at least). The novel by esteemed author George Orwell is considered a cult classic and a staple in modern-day literature. The chance to revisit the unique tale is coming quickly because the Orwell estate has officially given the greenlight for an accurate videogame adaptation.

George Orwell’s Animal Farm is being made into a video game.

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“Game of Thrones” fans have grown so impatient for George R.R. Martin to finish the next “A Song of Ice And Fire” book – the series that the HBO show is based on – that an artificial intelligence system just wrote the beginning of the sixth book.

Winter is kind of here.

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Turtles All The Way Down opens in a high school cafeteria, where our protagonist Aza sits anxiously, stuck in the middle of a thought spiral. “Admittedly, I have some anxiety problems, but I would argue it isn’t irrational to be concerned about the fact that you’re a skin-encased bacterial colony,” she says.

John Green read the first chapter of Turtles All the Way Down.

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Unmissable Weekly: September 3, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Entertainment Weekly announced today that V.E. Schwab has signed a $1 million deal with Tor Books for a new fantasy trilogy as well as a standalone novel. The Threads of Power trilogy is set within the same world as the Shades of Magic series, which concluded earlier this year with A Conjuring of Light. The fourth novel, tentatively titled Black Tabs, will focus on a female assassin in futuristic New York City.

I don’t know much about the business side of publishing, but I know enough. And not every woman author gets to have a 7-digit contract. So this is definitely a win for everyone. Congratulations, V.E. Schwab!

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Scott McGehee & David Siegel have made a deal at Warner Bros to write and direct a new version of Lord Of The Flies, based on the iconic William Golding novel. They plan to be faithful to the novel with one major twist: the young students stranded on a remote island who descend into a savage social order will be girls.

How about no?

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In the season-seven finale, Cersei confirmed that she hired a sellsword squad known as the Golden Company. In the books, the Golden Company backs a claimant to the Iron Throne who doesn’t appear in the show: Aegon VI Targaryen, the (ostensible) son of Prince Rhaegar and Elia Martell.

What Games of Thrones Season 7 tells us about the next ASOIAF book.

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On Friday, 1 September 2017, Harry Potter and Ginny Weasley travelled to King’s Cross station with their three children, James Sirius, Albus Severus, and Lily Luna. Ron and Hermione were also there, as well as Draco Malfoy and son Scorpius.

#19YearsLater

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