Unmissable Weekly: December 3, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Cassandra Clare, the best-selling author of the YA series The Mortal Instruments, announced on Tuesday she’s set to write a new adult fantasy series for Del Rey Books.

The first book, Sword Catcher, is currently in progress and will feature the “criminals, princes, magicians, and warriors” which Clare has been toying with in her head for years. It will mark her first foray into high fantasy and is likely to come on the heels of Queen of Air and Darkness, a Mortal Instruments sequel slated for release at the end of 2018. No publication date information for Sword Catcher has been made available.

YA powerhouse Cassandra Clare is crossing over.

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In real life, of course, we’re all flawed, and perhaps a lack of good fictional dudes suggests a lack of flesh-and-blood inspiration. But it’s worth noting that if I tried to make a list of “good women characters in literature,” the difficulty would be confining it.

Perhaps my judgement is askew, but I’m pretty certain Willem Ragnarsson (A Little Life) should’ve made it into this list of actually decent men in fiction.

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So after thinking about it all year, I’ve decided that I want to do something new in 2018: no more Twitter.

Veronica Roth is leaving Twitter.

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Though Fox shied away from bringing the book’s title to the big screen, they’re not avoiding bringing up the gay storyline in the first trailer. Yes, Simon is a story about a closeted kid played by Nick Robinson. It’s the first story about a gay kid getting a wide release from a major Hollywood studio.

The trailer doesn’t get into the fact that Simon’s in regular communication with a gay pen pal — a key part of the book — but it does show the protagonist kissing a boy and pondering his sexuality. There’s also a great scene at the end in which he wonders why straight people don’t have to come out like the gays do.

The Love, Simon trailer dropped earlier this week and I’m still freaking out!

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Unmissable Weekly: November 26, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Some of the most difficult issues facing us this past year — sexual harassment, police brutality and mental health — surfaced as themes in children’s books and young adult literature. In his first novel since The Fault in Our Stars, beloved YA writer John Green tackled the anguish of living with obsessive compulsive disorder. Angie Thomas, a debut novelist, captured the internal turmoil experienced by a black girl who witnesses her friend’s death at the hands of the police. Jennifer Mathieu created a playbook for a new generation of teen feminists.

Here are Time’s Top Ten Young Adult and Children’s Books of 2017.

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Neil Gaiman, Antonia Fraser, Philip Pullman and Malorie Blackman are among more than 150 signatories to a letter calling on secretary of state for education Justine Greening to halt the decline in school libraries or “consign a generation to a lifetime of low attainment and mobility”.

File under Reasons Why Neil Gaiman is a Top-Notch Human Being.

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A mother has made headlines after calling for Sleeping Beauty to be removed from her son’s primary school curriculum for its “inappropriate sexual” message.

Sarah Hall, from Northumberland Park, near Newcastle, says the fairytale teaches children that it’s OK to kiss a [woman] while she’s asleep.

This will sound dismissive, but, really, the kids are all right.

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Long since “City of Bones,” which published 10 years ago, authors like Silvera have made young-adult novels a place where queer love stories feel mainstream rather than an exception to the rule.

And they’re about far more than coming out. The new generation of LGBT young-adult literature has room for romance, inclusion and happily-ever-after.

On queer love stories, inclusion, and positive representation.

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Unmissable Weekly: November 19, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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These authors weave examinations of race, class, and social justice into their stories of adolescence, and their characters are often left questioning everything they know. Dear Martin, for instance, features many of the hallmarks of high-school drama: fragmented cliques, awkward crushes, and shifting friendships. But from the first chapter, Stone, who worked in teen mentoring before writing the novel, sets her focus on graver concerns. A simple question—What would Martin do if he were alive?—guides the novel’s protagonist throughout his senior year, as he encounters everything from his white classmates’ racism (down to one guy dressing up as a Klansman for Halloween) to police profiling. And while Justyce is drawn to King’s teachings of resilience and nonviolence, he is put increasingly on edge as he observes the failures of the world around him.

A look at contemporary YA books exploring racial injustice and police brutality.

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Imagine Entertainment has picked up feature film rights to Renee Ahdieh’s The Wrath and the Dawn.

The love story, told in the vein of A Thousand and One Nights, centers on the 18-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, Khalid, who takes a new bride every dawn only to execute her by sunrise. But when 16-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid, with a plan to stay alive and exact revenge for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls, she finds herself falling in love with him and that not all is as it seems with the young king. Shahrzad sets out to find the truth and stop the cycle of killing.

Congratulations, Renee Ahdieh!

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California has become the first state to approve LGBT-inclusive history textbooks for use in primary schools, the Advocate reports.

The California State Board of Education on Thursday approved 10 textbooks for kindergarten through eighth-grade students that include coverage of the historical contributions of LGBT people, and rejected two that failed to include such coverage.

California’s 2011 FAIR Education Act requires that schools teach about historical figures who were LGBT or who had disabilities. This is a victory!

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AHHHH! Check out Leah! And this color palette! It’s so beautiful and we CANNOT wait to see it on our shelves right next to Simon because the two books go together so well!

Becky Albertalli’s upcoming Leah on the Offbeat has a cover and it’s freaking amazing! Here is a fat, bisexual character on a cover and she gives precisely zero f*cks.

Unmissable Weekly: October 15, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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In addition to trademark romantic and coming-of-age elements, the upcoming book features an array of pop culture references that should especially excite movie buffs. From Twinkle, With Love is told from the perspective of aspiring filmmaker Twinkle Mehra, and uses her passion to tell her story: The book takes the form of letters Twinkle writes to her favorite directors.

I love it when authors play with format, and this sounds very exciting. Plus, look at the cover with a Desi woman!

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It was really hard, especially at first, to write about this thing that’s been such a big part of my life. But in another way, it was really empowering because I felt like if I could give it form or expression I could look at it and I could talk about it directly rather than being scared of it. And one of the main things I wanted to do in the book was to get at how isolating it can be to live with mental illness and also how difficult it can be for the people who are around you because you’re so isolated.

John Green talked about mental illness and writing a book that mirrors his own life.

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At a news conference at his London publisher’s office on Thursday, Mr. Ishiguro was characteristically self-effacing, saying that the award was a genuine shock. “If I had even a suspicion, I would have washed my hair this morning,” he said.

He added that when he thinks of “all the great writers living at this time who haven’t won this prize, I feel slightly like an impostor.”

Congratulations Kazuo Ishiguro, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature!

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“Excited to share the first poster for a film that celebrates love,” Berlanti, who directs the film, tweeted with the first poster.

The first Love, Simon poster is here and I HAVE ZERO CHILLS.

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Unmissable Weekly: October 8, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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The book to film adaptation of Becky Albertalli’s [Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda] has done a bit of re-branding as we approach its 2018 release.

As confirmed by the author this afternoon, the new title for the movie is simply Love, Simon — a reference to the e-mails in the story as well as the romantic aspect.

And as Becky puts it, “The movie feels like a love letter. Now the title does too.

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From the moment I finished Dumplin’ I knew I wanted to return to Clover City, but I also knew that I was 100% satisfied with how Willowdean’s story ended. When I got the green light to write another book in the same world, I thought long and hard about who intrigued me the most (Millie! Though Hannah and Mitch were a close second!) and who needed to do the most growing (Callie!).

There’s a cover for Julie Murphie’s companion novel, Puddin’, and it’s gorgeous!

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It began with more than 1,500 books.

With all the works submitted by publishers, the judges for this year’s National Book Awards have had their hands (and bookshelves) full the past few months. But that daunting number of contenders winnowed further Wednesday, as the National Book Foundation announced the finalists for its literary prize — just five works each in four categories: fiction, nonfiction, poetry and young people’s literature.

The 2017 National Book Award shortlists were recently announced and 75% were written by women (!) and 50% were by people of color (!). There’s also one Oglala Lakota poet. I’m impressed by these numbers!

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Two YA authors who met-cute via their agent have co-written a novel—in which two boys meet-cute in a New York City post office. What If It’s Us by Adam Silvera and Becky Albertalli will be published cute too: it will be released in fall 2018 by not just one but two HarperCollins imprints: HarperTeen and Balzer + Bray.

No, I am not freaking out. YOU are.

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Unmissable Weekly: October 1, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Harry Potter: The Wand Collection provides a detailed look at each major wand used in the Harry Potter films, along with a breakdown of what it’s made of and why that matters. Harry and Voldemort, of course, both have wands with a phoenix feather core (drawn from Dumbledore’s own phoenix, Fawkes) and that connection has major consequences for the series. Ron Weasley, for his part, goes through a couple different wands over the course of the series as they’re broken and misplaced — all three are examined here.

Insight Editions is releasing a book in November 14 detailing the nature of each major Harry Potter character’s relationship with their wand.

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“Yes I am,” Parton confirms when asked if she’s working with Aniston. “She’s producing and starring in a movie called Dumplin’ and it was a best-selling book and in the book this girl that’s the character was a Dolly fan and loved her music.”

Parton continues, “And so it inspired her in her life and so of course they’re using a lot of my music from the old days but they asked me to write some new pieces and a theme song.”

Full circle! Dolly Parton is writing original music for Dumplin’.

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I make a decision about what to review based on a number of factors: Is the book newsworthy? Is it a book that I think our readers should know about? Is it a novel that’s doing something new, or a nonfiction book that has an interesting argument? Is the author important? Then, of course, there are my own tastes — what’s exciting and enticing to me.

On the most recent member of The New York Times‘ team of daily book critics Parul Sehgal’s process of selecting and reviewing books.

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Grishaverse fans, rejoice: Leigh Bardugo’s next book not only returns to the world she created but centers on one of her most beloved characters too. Due out in Winter 2019, King of Scars centers on Nikolai Lantsov, King of Ravka, who we first met as the young, mysterious commander Sturmhond.

THIS IS NOT A DRILL.

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Unmissable Weekly: September 24, 2017

Bookish and Awesome’s weekly round-up of buzz-worthy news, lists, and/or think pieces from around the bookternet in bite size. Click on the links to be directed to the full articles.

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Pakistan’s newest female superhero has vowed to battle venal officials and protect battered women, as her creator tries to inspire the next generation to fight injustice in a deeply patriarchal society.

The new Pakistan Girl comic series is based on Sarah, a regular teenager with a pet cat, who discovers she has superhuman powers after waking from a coma caused by a blast in her village.

Good news is good.

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Kirkus Reviews, the nation’s leading pre-publication journal of book reviews, today announced the six finalists for the fourth annual Kirkus Prize in the categories of Fiction, Nonfiction, and Young Readers’ Literature. The Kirkus Prize is one of the richest annual literary awards in the world. Winners in the three categories will each receive $50,000, and will be announced at a special ceremony in Austin, Texas on Thursday, November 2, 2017.

The 2017 Kirkus Prize finalists were recently announced and yaaay Angie Thomas and The Hate U Give!

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The heroine of Hank Green’s debut novel, “An Absolutely Remarkable Thing,” is an art student in New York City named April May, who finds herself at the center of a vast international mystery. One day, April stumbles on a giant robot sculpture in Midtown Manhattan, and makes a video with the figure, which goes viral. She becomes famous as news spreads that similar sculptures have mysteriously appeared in dozens of cities, and people around the world struggle to understand where the figures came from and what they mean.

What an absolutely delightful time to be a nerdfighter!

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Judi Dench is in early talks to join Disney’s “Artemis Fowl” movie adaptation from director Kenneth Branagh.

Written by Eoin Colfer, the children’s books follow the brilliant and cunning 12-year-old eponymous criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl II, whose plot to extort gold from the secret Fairy People puts him directly in the crosshairs of some of the most dangerous creatures on earth.

Branagh and Disney’s Artemis Fowl movie adaption is beginning to take shape. Disney recently dated the film for an August 9, 2019 release.

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