Top Ten Books I’ve Read So Far In 2015

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish in which book bloggers list their top ten picks for whatever the current prompt is.

It is time for mid-year lists! I initially intended to do my Top 3 sometime next week, but since today’s TTT is basically that and a little more, I’m gonna go ahead book pimping!

NOTE: This list is in ascending lineup and the upper three were picked solely from a pool of new releases.

*Click the cover to be directed to the book’s Goodreads page.*

Playlist for the Dead 01   Siege and Storm 01   Vanishing Girls 02

Playlist for the Dead by Michelle Falkoff
A gawky, nerdy, witty narrator with a subtle undertone of snark? Yes please and thank you very much! Also, this book is a portrait of teenagers trying to balance on the precarious tightrope between wanting to find a place in the society and navigating the sea of expectations imposed upon by the various people surrounding them.

Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo
STURM-FREAKING-HOND! (By now, you’ve probably seen this at least a dozen times, but sorry not sorry.) Siege and Storm is such a rewarding sequel. With more power play and emotional tension, it’s effortlessly entertaining and fiercely moving.

Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver
This is more a character study, less a crime novel. Oliver doesn’t casually use the term “complex” and there’s a major WTF moment.

All the Bright Places 02   Guardian   Mosquitoland

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven
Not my first title on depression and mental illness but definitely the one on the subject of [spoiler]. Thoughtful, provocative and visceral.

Guardian by Alex London
Guardian, like its predecessor Proxy, blasts one stereotype after another. The action matches the emotional weight of the story and just, the depiction of unrequited love is three bars too close for me. Also, representation.

Mosquitoland by David Arnold
The greatest triumph of this debut lies in its MC’s growth, juxtaposed with her quest to reach and save her mom. Her physical journey is as captivating as her emotional one is touching. Plus, exceedingly unforgettable characters, people!

Winger 06   More Happy Than Not 03   The Darkest Part of the Forest   Simon Vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda

Winger by Andrew Smith
Do I even have to write something for this one? I DID A F*CKING BY-THE-NUMBERS ARTICLE.

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera
Oh, this one’s your typical coming out sto—HOW ABOUT NO? Adam sucker punched me not once! More Happy Than Not is unrelenting and poignant and geeky and chemistry-laden and painfully honest but ultimately hopeful.

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black
Leave it to Black to be all beautiful and lyrical; I can let her words wash over me any day. Make no mistake, The Darkest Part of the Forest is fantastical, but at the heart of it, it’s as much about family dysfunction.

Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
WTF ARE WORDS?!!! So, okay. I seriously think this’ll be my best book of the year. Becky nailed the character voice you guys! Her debut is sexually AND racially diverse, in a sensitive manner. It tackles the joys and complications of a close-knit family as well as the politics of friendship. It’s adorable and charming and lovely and, just, I’m in love with this novel! Hard.

What made YOUR list?

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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Monthly Bookish Awesomeness: June 2015

In which I recap what went down in the last four weeks here and outside the blog.

#LOVEWINS YOU GUYS!

Daaang, we’re approaching the other half of the year already! Quite a lot has happened this month not only to me but also to the wider blogosphere (happy blogoversary Hazel @ Stay Bookish, Joséphine @ Word Revel, Jen @ Pop! Goes The Reader and Jamie @ The Perpetual Page-Turner!). June, it would seem, is a time for firsts: I went to my first book signing (which was so much fun!), had my first official author interview, had my first taste of a known author and reviewed an adult book on Bookish and Awesome.

Fair warning: this recap is sort-of-definitely-maybe-absolutely lengthy and if that isn’t your thing, you can just jump to the particular topic you’re interested in.

Also? THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for all you did with the More Happy Than Not Tag! Your support is heartening!

Books I Read

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Other Stuff I Posted

Book Birthdays

The Summer of Chasing Mermaids 01   Between the Notes   Untitled-4   Emmy and Oliver 01

Happy book birthday to More Happy Than Not (Soho Teen), The Summer of Chasing Mermaids (Simon Pulse), The Witch Hunter (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers), Between the Notes (HarperTeen), Every Last Word (Disney Hyperion), The Night We Said Yes (HarperTeen), and Emmy & Oliver (HarperTeen), which all found a place in the shelves this month!

Book Radar

Paperweight   Go Set a Watchman 01

I only have two titles for Book Radar because, come on, Harper Lee! I’m waiting for Paperweight (7th, HarperTeen) and Go Set a Watchman (14th, Harper) (!!!!!).

Gold Star

“”No longer may this liberty be denied,” Justice Anthony M. Kennedy wrote for the majority in the historic decision. “No unison is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were.”” This Adam Liptak wrote for The New York Times on Friday, June 26th, as the U.S. Supreme Court ruling, by a 5-to-4 vote, made same-sex marriage a right nationwide. I say, yes, America! Finally! Then YouTube shared THIS and excuse me but I’m having ALL THE FEELS. Love, friends, indeed won. ❤

Around the Interwebs

Adam Silver and MORE HAPPY THAN NOT

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So, okay. It is no secret to regular readers of Bookish and Awesome how huge a fan I am of Adam Silvera and his debut More Happy Than Not, which came out this month. And, naturally, the dude owned his publication month. From interviews to open letters, I got you covered!

On why More Happy Than Not has not one but four (4!) awful patriarchal figures  On the case of missing fancy suits and why settling on being more happy than not isn’t so bad  On the memory Adam would most like to forget  On exploring nature vs. nurture in regards to homosexuality  On creating his own MFA program and writing his way to publication  On Adam’s favorite TV shows  On why people mistake homosexuality as a choice  On who would be great friends for Aaron Soto outside the book  On learning when something has to go, it goes  On top secret writing tips  On Adam’s writing style and process

How was your June? Any awesome book or film or music or dessert you consumed this month? Or do you have a post I somehow missed but you think I’d like? Let’s talk!

*That’s a legit thing.

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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“I Ultimately Stayed True to Aaron’s Story”: An Interview with Adam Silvera

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Today, I am very thrilled to be sharing a Q&A with one of the coolest debut authors of the year, whose first book is a sensitive—if often brutally honest—tale of growing up and finding one’s place in a community not as rational and accepting. More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera rings true no matter what your race and gender identity is. And months before its publication, people are already talking. Silvera’s debut in fact received four (4!) starred-reviews, with School Library Journal claiming it “an engrossing, intense narrative.”

We talked about pajamas, Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda, embarrassing teenage episodes and taking a break from writing when you must. Here’s Adam:

Shelumiel: Give us 3 random facts about Adam Silvera.
Adam: 1) Two of my currently eight tattoos were decided on at the tattoo shop.
2) Pajamas are probably my favorite thing, especially my Grinch pajamas.
3) I hate odd numbers.
4) I love even numbers.

S: I cannot overstate this: you have such a strong debut! What was the hardest scene to write in More Happy Than Not?
A: Thanks so much! I can’t talk about the hardest scene because it would spoil stuff for those that haven’t read the book, but there were TONS of scenes where I just felt like a monster for being the pen behind the scenes, but know that I ultimately stayed true to Aaron’s story.

S: On the flip side, what was the easiest?
A: The easiest scenes were all the fun scenes between Aaron and his girlfriend Genevieve, and Aaron and his crush Thomas. Tons got trimmed from those scenes because I stayed in them for too long.

S: Your book is not only sexually but also racially diverse. When Aaron Soto popped into your mind, has he always been Puerto Rican or did you decide first that you are going to have a Puerto Rican character?
A: Aaron was always Puerto Rican, even when his last name was Peters. I chose Peters because I was crushing on Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker, but that name wasn’t true to his heritage and Aaron being Puerto Rican is more important than me crushing on Andrew Garfield.

S: In an MTV piece, you discussed how growing up in Bronx has informed you in writing Aaron’s story. And, having devoured MHTN, it’s evident how crucial that element played out. But what was your inspiration in terms of books?
A: I was inspired to write More Happy Than Not when I was wondering about if I would’ve changed my sexual orientation as a teenager from homosexual to heterosexual to lead a simpler life. I wouldn’t have to worry about coming out or getting beat up and so many other things. So to explore this nurture versus nature avenue, I looped in the Leteo memory alteration procedure to play with science versus nature.

S: What about the books you wish you had when you’re sixteen?
A: Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli, duh. I would’ve been openly gay at 16, or at least less resistant to the idea of coming out, and definitely chasing fewer girls. Simon is such a smart and hilarious and TRUE narrator and I’m positive he’s going to inspire comfort with one’s sexuality for this next generation.

S: The Scorpius Hawthorne books and the phrase “you-know-what” are nods to the Harry Potter series, did I get that right? So let’s play Sorting Hat. Which houses will Aaron, Thomas, Genevieve and Collin go to?
A: Ha! The “you-know-what” did NOT come from HP but I can see how you made that connection, and I shouldn’t rule it out as a deeply subconscious decision. It was more of Aaron being too uncomfortable to discuss suicide and suicide attempts head-on. Scorpius Hawthorne is 100% a nod to HP, though.
Aaron is probably Gryffindor because he does show a lot of courage, even in his inactions, because he’s dealing with trials that are arguably greater than his peers. Thomas is Hufflepuff—cool, passive, and hard-working. Genevieve is tough. I want to say Gryffindor, too. To love someone who may not be able to love you back takes a lot of heart, but she’s also an amazing, well-rounded and genuine person (who makes mistakes, too) that might land her in Hufflepuff. She’s got an edge to her but nothing that would propel her to Slytherin, and her choices aren’t always the wisest so let’s scratch out Ravenclaw. (Though I do love when she puts herself before Aaron—THAT was smart.) Collin isn’t brave, isn’t hardworking by choice, and he’s not a genius. He’s not cunning, but he is very morally questionable. SLYTHERIN it is!
(S: I almost started this question with: “The Scorpius Hawthorne books and the phrase “you-know-what” are nods to the Harry Potter series, obviously.” Oh gods. Do I feel better I rewrote it!)

S: In the book, Aaron thought Jean Grey was stronger than Wolverine and he lost to his brother in an Avengers vs Street Fighters match because he chose Captain America instead of Black Widow. Serious question: which of the ladies will win in a duel?
A: Black Widow, I love you, but Jean Grey would dominate this match from high up in the air. Kind of hard to beat someone who can toss you around without physically touching you.

S: If you were to have a Leteo procedure, what particularly embarrassing teenage episode would you want to forget?
A: Haha! Good question. I’d probably forget the embarrassment that comes with telling a joke that doesn’t land to large crowds. I get really red and embarrassed.
(S: I SO can relate!)

S: Now let’s talk about your writing process. You sold your second book (and that’s really awesome, dude; you rock!) even before your debut got published. Tell us about that and how different, or similar, the experience was writing the two novels.
A: This experience has been very different. I wrote More Happy for myself, and I’m writing History under contract. That’s scary and there are now expectations. Tons of pressure I’m not handling very well so ask me again after I turn in that book.

S: We all know writing (and getting published) is not all fun and games. What one-liner advice would you give us aspiring writers?
A: Take a break when you must, but don’t stretch it out for too long or going back to the page will feel impossible.

S: And lastly, what do you hope readers take away from More Happy Than Not?
A: Tons of things, but mainly that sexuality is very complicated, and choices aren’t always the foundation of it.

Thank you, Adam! It was SO MUCH FUN talking to you and I couldn’t agree more with Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda! Your book comes out today (no pun intended) and I’m definitely sure it’ll resonate with a lot of readers, whether coming from Aaron’s, Genevieve’s, Thomas’s or even Collin’s perspective. You really are killing it, Dude!

And while you’re at it, Adam wrote an unabashed piece for Gay YA on never selling your heart out. Check it out!

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The Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-relief procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto—miracle cure-alls don’t tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. Aaron could never forget how he’s grown up poor, how his friends aren’t there for him, or how his father committed suicide in their one-bedroom apartment. Aaron has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it’s not enough.

Then Thomas shows up. He has a sweet movie-watching setup on his roof, and he doesn’t mind Aaron’s obsession with a popular fantasy series. There are nicknames, inside jokes. Most importantly, Thomas doesn’t mind talking about Aaron’s past. But Aaron’s newfound happiness isn’t welcome on his block. Since he can’t stay away from Thomas or suddenly stop being gay, Aaron must turn to Leteo to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he is.

Goodreads | Amazon | The Book Depository | Fully Booked

Author

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Adam Silvera was born and raised in the Bronx and is tall for no reason. He was a bookseller before shifting to children’s publishing where he worked at a literary development company, a creative writing website for teens, and as a book reviewer of children’s and young adult novels. He lives in New York City.

Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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Monthly Bookish Awesomeness: May 2015

In which I recap what went down in the last four weeks here and outside the blog.

Hey y’all! So I know I’ve been away for more than a couple of weeks now—and I apologize—but I recently went through a surgery and a slightly unexpected weekend escape before that. I’m recovering well, though, and excited to be back blogging regularly soon!

May had been really wonderful. My  childhood best friends were in town, however briefly, and I spent the whole weekend with them before I had my operation, which went successfully. This month, I also got to read Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda (FINALLY!!!) and More Happy Than Not, which both exceeded my expectations. So yaaay times two! And oh. I watched Pitch Perfect! No, not the sequel. Oops. It was pretty aca-mazing.

First week of May, the lovely Hazel Ureta of Stay Bookish invited me over at her blog for Behind the Lens and I’m a happy snowman! Thank you so much, dear!

Books I Read

Grasshopper Jungle 01More Happy Than Not 02Half Bad 02

  • Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith – Smith is many things, but what he does best is writing complex teenage boys. I had problems with the narrative style but, overall, it’s a candid look on growing up.
  • More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera – This is a strong debut you guys, with characters as unforgettable as the book is unflinching in its portrayal of confusion, love, homophobia, friendship and a lot more. Silvera surely is set to win many, many fans.
  • Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli – There’s only one thing you need to know about this novel: Becky nailed the character voice. I mean, I can’t even. Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda is such a charming, smile-inducing read. The cast instantly feels familiar and you can’t help but root for them. WHO GOES OUT THE GATE PUBLISHING HER FIRST BOOK THIS GOOD?!!!
  • Uprooted by Naomi Novik – I have conflicting opinions about this. Very. But it’s reminiscent of Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone with fae-ish elements. And, somehow I requested this from Netgalley thinking it’s YA, but it’s not.
  • Noggin by John Corey Whaley – Gaaah. I’ve never cry heaved so hard. There was this one scene that’s just beautiful and sad and poignant and I lost it. The overall tone was very nostalgic and there were times the MC was too whiny for my liking but it still is one of those stories that you know will stay with you in a long while.
  • Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver – D (of Oops! I Read A Book Again) and I are currently buddy-reading this one. This is my first title from the author.
  • Half Bad by Sally Green – Yeah, I read this in April but wrote a review this month. Terrific character connections, blunt writing style and quietly compelling.

Other Stuff I Posted

Book Birthdays

Made You Up 01   Uprooted 01   Anything Could Happen 01   Extraordinary Means 01

Happy book birthday to Made You Up (Greenwillow Books), Uprooted (Del Rey), Anything Could Happen (Push), and Extraordinary Means (26th, Katherine Tegen Books), which all found a place in the shelves this month!

Book Radar

More Happy Than Not 03   The Witch Hunter 02   Every Last Word 01   Untitled-4

June will see both More Happy Than Not (2nd, Soho Teen) and The Witch Hunter (2nd, Little, Brown Books for Young Readers) coming out into the wild, woohoo! Along with Every Last Word (16th, Disney Hyperion), and The Night We Said Yes (16th, HarperTeen).

Gold Star

I’m introducing a new feature in my monthly recap! Gold Star, inspired by Gretchen Rubin’s Happier with Gretchen Rubin podcast, aims to spotlight a person, book, project or anything that makes the world a happier place (because I’m cliché like that). And this month’s Gold Star belongs to… The #BooksArentDangerous initiative! So basically, together with The NOVL, Margaret Stohl and Kami Garcia asked the bookish community to upload a photo using the hashtag. And for every picture posted, they will donate a book to First Book, to help underfunded schools and libraries. They reached their goal of 5,000 and I just think that, for readers like us, spreading the love of reading is such a fulfilling cause to be a part of. Fantastic job, ladies!

Around the Interwebs

I hope you all had an awesome May! For those of you who didn’t get to attend BEA15, did you torture yourselves by staying on Twitter (like I did)? And for those of you lucky bastards who went, what was your favorite part? Let’s talk in the comments below!

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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REVIEW: More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

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Title: More Happy Than Not
Author: Adam Silvera
Format: E-ARC
Publication: June 2nd 2015 by Soho Teen
Source: Publisher via Edelweiss (thank you Meredith Barnes, Soho Press and Edelweiss!)
Genre: Fiction—Coming of Age, Contemporary
Other classifications: LGBTQIA, Young Adult

Goodreads | Amazon | The Book Depository | Fully Booked

Synopsis

The Leteo Institute’s revolutionary memory-relief procedure seems too good to be true to Aaron Soto—miracle cure-alls don’t tend to pop up in the Bronx projects. Aaron could never forget how he’s grown up poor, how his friends aren’t there for him, or how his father committed suicide in their one-bedroom apartment. Aaron has the support of his patient girlfriend, if not necessarily his distant brother and overworked mother, but it’s not enough.

Then Thomas shows up. He has a sweet movie-watching setup on his roof, and he doesn’t mind Aaron’s obsession with a popular fantasy series. There are nicknames, inside jokes. Most importantly, Thomas doesn’t mind talking about Aaron’s past. But Aaron’s newfound happiness isn’t welcome on his block. Since he can’t stay away from Thomas or suddenly stop being gay, Aaron must turn to Leteo to straighten himself out, even if it means forgetting who he is.

Review

I received a review copy from the publisher which in no way swayed my opinion about the work.

More Happy Than Not is a strong debut from YA newcomer Adam Silvera. It is as unrelenting as it is hopeful, as gut-wrenching as it is absorbing.

Set in a Bronx neighborhood that is a character of its own and with a bit of a speculative tinge, Aaron Soto’s story may seem ordinary, another of those teens navigating the firsts—first love, first kiss, first sex. But it’s not before long ’til Silvera starts tearing down expectations, busting one assumption after another. The plot twist sucker-punched me and, just when I thought he’s exhausted his arsenal, he delivers the final blow. He paints the extent to which being gay in a close-minded community may lead to all sorts of horror with severe, and often brutal, honesty. There were multiple instances I had to stop reading because his words cut deep.

“This is one of those times where you swear you have to be sleeping and living a nightmare because it’s so impossible that your life can only be a string of bad things until you’re completely abandoned.”

In More Happy Than Not, the author plays at one of the oldest societal debates: nature vs. nurture. Aaron firmly holds that his being a “dude-liker” is something he didn’t choose but rather something he had to deal with. It’s refreshing to view sexuality through this lens, especially in line with homophobia. And especially considering how this novel wins at diversity. Not only does it have a gay MC, it has a Puerto Rican gay MC. But that’s not all of it. In one scene, Thomas tells Aaron, “I was the only brown Scorpius Hawthorne” and it doesn’t feel forced. I think Silvera’s voice—unabashed and observant as it is—is a promising addition to an important conversation.

“It’s not like my heart is in running or anything like that, but at least I learned that you can’t always choose who you’re going to be. Sometimes you’re fast enough to run track. Sometimes you’re not.”

Then, you have the characterization. One thing that’s remarkable is the chemistry between the characters. They are complicated, thrown in further complicated positions, but Silvera successfully balances the complexity with relatability. He didn’t try to redeem the bad guys (for lack of a better term) and that’s a major score. And there’s family dysfunction. Aaron comes from a poor family (which, I cannot overstate this, is scarce in literature but is a reality) and it’s not an easy household.

“This is the most painfully confusing time in my life and he’s the first person who said all the right words to me and reminds me of the first days of summer where you leave home without jacket, and my favorite songs playing over and over.”

I want to point out, as well, how geeky the book is. There are several pop culture references—leaning heavily on comics—and you don’t need to know that the author is a potterhead to observe the winks and nods to the Harry Potter series. Plus, I really enjoyed moments when Aaron and Genevieve (I’m going to use “the girlfriend” as a descriptor but, trust me, you’d want to get to know her) would hang out or when Aaron and Thomas would and, this is me being nostalgic, I love how street games are a big part of the community Aaron lives in.

“Do you think there’s a chance you were someone really awful in a past life? Like Darth Vader? I feel like you can’t catch a break.”

With characters as unforgettable as the book is unflinching in its portrayal of confusion, love, homophobia, family, friendship and a lot more, Silvera is set to win many, many fans. He’s barely started, too. Readers who adore Benjamin Alire Sáenz’s Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe will come upon another favorite.

4.5 out of 5

Author

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Adam Silvera was born and raised in the Bronx and is tall for no reason. He was a bookseller before shifting to children’s publishing where he worked at a literary development company, a creative writing website for teens, and as a book reviewer of children’s and young adult novels. He lives in New York City.

Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Website

 Have I convinced you to pick up this title when it comes out (2 weeks from today!)? Are you a fan of heartrending coming-of-age stories? And will you take the Leteo procedure if you can? There’s an amazing pool of emerging new voices in the book industry, especially in YA, who are your recent favorites? Tell me in the comments below! I always want to hear from you! Also, while you’re at it, you may want to participate in The “More Happy Than Not” Tag?

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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I Am More Happy Than Not

More Happy Than Not 01

UPDATED: Until now, I’m still overwhelmed by Adam Silvera’s and Becky Albertalli’s reactions to this post, not to mention the generous comments left by other bloggers (thank you!). So I’ve decided to turn this into a tag (well, not without encouragement from fellow bookworm/friend Dianne of Oops! I Read A Book Again)! There are only three simple rules: (1) answer the question “What makes you more happy than not?”, (2) link back to this post (so I can read your entry) or to the person who tagged you, and (3) have FUN.

Whenever I see piles of books everywhere, though at this point it is ridiculous how I still don’t have bookshelves, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I drink coffee, though almost always the instant kind, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I spend time with my now two-year-old godson Carlisle, though seldom and inevitably leads to me feeling like five hundred pounds of exhausted (I’m exaggerating but you get the point), I am more happy than not.

Whenever I listen to music, though the same albums again and again, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I go through the comments in my blog, though far from reaching the count worth speaking of, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I eat, though a basic necessity but especially when it’s time for dessert, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I get a tweet from someone I look up to one way or another, though rendering me a big mess of fanboy incoherence often times, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I write, though not as productive as I wish I were, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I daydream of one day walking across the streets of Paris, though a hackneyed portrait, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I’m reminded that I have a loving family (grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins included), though my parents parted when I was eleven, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I am hit by the realization that I have this diverse bunch of wonderful people I call friends, though the half I suck at getting in touch with and the other half I have yet to meet in person (yes, don’t talk nonsense, our friendship built through the internet is legit), I am more happy than not.

Whenever I watch a film, though not as regularly as I used to and especially when I go alone, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I sing and dance in the shower, though sounding nowhere near decent, I am more happy than not.

Whenever I reflect to that one fortuitous summer day when I picked up To Kill a Mockingbird when I could’ve chosen something else, though there was no way of knowing then how it’ll change my life forever (okay that’s super cheesy, whatever), I am more happy than not.

And whenever I read, I am perpetually more happy than not. (Though, yeah, some characters are vexing.)

What makes YOU More Happy Than Not?

Here’s what makes other people More Happy Than Not:

Summer @ Xingsings
Wesaun @ Oreo And Books
Miguel @ The Quirky Reader
Randstein @ Hyperion Sturm
Michelle @ Putting My Feet In The Dirt
Joey @ Thoughts And Afterthoughts
Danni Mae @ Danni Mae
Stefani @ Caught Read Handed
Liam @ Liam’s Library
Dianne @ Oops! I Read A Book Again
Katherine @ Neon Yeti Reads
Josephine @ Josie’s Book Corner
Ashley @ Dear World…
Josh @ Been There, Read That
Alyssa @ The Devil Orders Takeout
Maren @ The Worn Bookmark
Marie @ Drizzle And Hurricane Books
Aimee @ Deadly Darlings
Faye @ Written In Blue
Lauren @ SERIESous Book Reviews
Casey @ Inspired By The Page
Chiara @ Books For A Delicate Eternity
Romi @ Where The Writer Comes To Write
Chrystal @ Snowdrop Dreams
Erika @ Erika in Bookventureland
Christina @ Fairy Skeletons
Lia @ Book Land
Raven @ Dreamy Addictions
Analee @ Book Snacks
Victoria @ Escape Into Pages
Kimsiang @ The BookRabbicorn
Joey @ Bloggin’ Books And Stuff
Rose Marie @ A Reading Writer
Erika @ Rickus Bookshelf
LJ @ All My Love, LJ
Aetheristrux @ The Amazing Life Of A Bookworm
Alexia @ Booklexia
McKenzie @ Bookish Things And Tea
Stephanie @ A Reader’s Oasis
Tasha @ The Bookie Monsters
Cassandra @ Life With Cassandra
Kate @ The Book Goddess
Ashley @ Dreaming Through Literature
Charley @ Booksandbakes1
Caz @ Travelling In My Bookcase
Shannon @ In A Wonderland They Lie
Lizzy @ Lizzyreadsbooks
Amy @ Curiouser And Curiouser
Victoria @ Addlepates And Book Nerds

You can also stalk follow me elsewhere! On Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Goodreads, and Bloglovin.

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